ten slang slung plus one

clinger : a female dancing very close to her partner (1890)

cossack : a policeman (1850s)

pull the devil by the tail : to take a risk of ruin (ca. 1750)

the devil’s guts : a surveyor’s chain  (1670s – 1700s)

flicker :  a drinking glass  (1700s)

good as good : extremely good ( 1850 )

head-rails  : the teeth (nautical ; 1785)

lash : violence ( Australian ; 1916 )

queer the pitch : to spoil a deal (1901)       tulip and palm 004

scammered : tipsy ( 1840 )

slang-tree : a stage (1850-1950)

Lilly-slang-tree : ( I made this one up ; no meaning ; 2013 )

5 Comments

Filed under humor

5 responses to “ten slang slung plus one

  1. I remember working for a guy who my friend described – “Taking him with you is to pull the devil by the tail. The last time I took him along, he was so scammered, he queered the pitch. Up on the slang-tree when sober, he’s good-as-good. But, after a few pops from the flicker, he’s prone to lash and you might end up in the company of a cossack threatening to smash him in the head-rails and tie him up with the devil’s guts, at which point, he’ll be as close to you as a clinger on the lily-slang-tree.”

  2. Reblogged this on No Facilities and commented:
    You’ll have to visit Dan’s (the other Dan) page to understand this:

    Taking him with you is to pull the devil by the tail. The last time I took him along, he was so scammered, he queered the pitch. Up on the slang-tree when sober, he’s good-as-good. But, after a few pops from the flicker, he’s prone to lash and you might end up in the company of a cossack threatening to smash him in the head-rails and tie him up with the devil’s guts, at which point, he’ll be as close to you as a clinger on the lily-slang-tree.

    Fun, albeit unintentional writing prompt.

  3. This was a fun post full of a complicated slang that I did use the Flicker in Dan Antion’s comment section. Raising a “flicker” for a great week ahead for you!
    This sounds like a foreign language! 😀

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